Posted June 5th 2010 at 1:07 pm by
in The Urban Labs

Ten Things You Can Do to Win a Political Campaign

CoLab Mel King Fellow Malia Lazu originally wrote Ten Things You Can Do to Win a Political Campaign for The Nation magazine.  In this post, she examines her most important point in that article: “Don’t Blame the Voters”.

I believe in the power of the vote.  I believe that organized people can change the world and overcome political games infecting our democracy.  The first organization I started, Mass Vote, successfully increased voter turn out setting the stage for diversity of candidates running for office, as well as winning a redistricting law suit.  This column I wrote for The Nation magazine allowed me to highlight some tactics I have used successfully for years to go beyond shallow victories every election.  These tactics can build a tradition of voting in your community.  I want to call your attention in the article to step four: Stop Blaming Your Voters.

Don’t blame the voters. Politics is the only industry that blames the consumer for not buying its product. Elections are a one-day sale; it’s your campaign’s job to get people excited enough to vote. The best way to do this is by studying candidates who understand how to build not just campaigns but movements. Check out how Keith Ellison does it in Minnesota and how Chellie Pingree does it in Maine.

 

MIT Tech TV

In this engaging forty-second clip, Lazu explains her theory to the Mel King Fellows. January 2010.

This is an evolutionary shift for politics and a maturation needed for us to continue to encourage citizens to vote.  Like life, it does you no good to blame someone else for your failures.  Enjoy the article, and try the tactics and help give American citizens a reason to believe in the power of their vote.

CoLab is a 501c3 and does not endorse political candidates or parties.  The links of organizations or campaigns are used to highlight working models mentioned in the article; it is in no way meant as an endorsement of any political candidate or partisan position on any issue.

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